how to prevent holes in shirts near the belly button

How to Prevent Pinholes in T-Shirts Near your Belly Button

Fashion Advice

What, if anything, can be done to prevent the tiny holes that my t shirts get, where they rub the waist band of my jeans? I have tried wearing a camisole and ironing interfacing to the inside of that area, but neither worked for me. I am at the point of giving up jeans! Any ideas?

how to prevent holes in t-shirtsOh, those dreaded pinholes in t-shirts and knit tops! Such pinholes are caused by friction against the metal hardware on jeans. Add working at a counter, a heavy crossbody bag, or your seatbelt and they appear even more quickly (more friction plus body heat). Add in the mix the tissue-weight or lower quality knits and jeans that have part of the waistband stick out above the button. Throw the shirt in the dryer and the pinhole will grow, destroying what is likely your favorite shirt.

There's plenty of hacks online that claim to stop holes from appearing at the bottom half of t-shirts and knit tops… and most of them as you know don't work. I too saw the tip about the interfacing and wondered how it affected the drape of a shirt, especially since I vary between untucking and tucking in my t-shirts. You're not the first to tell me that the camisole trick also didn't stop it. I read once to cover the button of jeans with a Band-Aid and while it may have worked, it left a gummy residue on my button (and don't accidentally launder your jeans with a Band-Aid on it, that creates even more of a mess). My favorite hack found online was just to wear crop tops. Not really helpful, especially for the workplace.

How to Prevent Pinholes in your T-Shirts

Tucking in your top, even if it's a half tuck, is the easiest and free solution. Another solution is wear pull-on pants or pants with a tab closure. But what about those of us who love our jeans and don't want to tuck in our tops?

The best solution is to cover the hardware causing the damage. Belt buckles can be just as damaging, but if you can find a belt with a smooth buckle that may help. Long-time readers know I am a huge fan of Beltaway. This is a stretchy belt free of any metal hardware that is virtually invisible under untucked knits. The buckle is smooth plastic and large enough to cover your jean button even when sitting. These belts come in a variety of styles and colors (I have a white one for white jeans, navy for regular denim, black for black jeans). FYI, this is a belt you don't have to take off at TSA check-in at the airport! If you wish to find something already in your closet, consider wearing a scarf through your belt loops (I love this look and have worn it in this post and this post).

Companies have seen the need for button covers that prevent friction and have made some handy gadgets. In the US, Shirt Guardian makes button covers that smooth the edges and prevent friction. Their site is quite informative, helping you choose the right size cover and providing instruction on how to put it on your jeans. Shipping is free if you live in the States. In the UK, there's Holé, a company that makes silicone caps for denim buttons. Both companies ship internationally but there may be fees. Both companies state their product can be left on your jeans, even when laundered. I also found a gadget called Lickedy Klip, which is a piece of folded plastic that slides over your waistband to cover your button. I have not tried any of these products; if you have do share your reviews in the comments.

How to Repair Pinholes in your T-Shirts

As soon as you see one of these pinholes, don't wait and definitely don't launder again (it will just make the hole larger). There are some pretty easy ways to repair or disguise pinholes in t-shirts and knit tops.

  • I love Stitch Witchery for many things, including repairing t-shirts. Using the ultra-light version, cut a piece a bit bigger than the hole and place it on the inside of the shirt. Then cut a piece a very lightweight fabric stabilizer (this is a good one for knits) a bit bigger than the Stitch Witchery. With a dampened pressing cloth (just spray with water, no need to get soaking wet) and your iron on the medium or wool setting, press your iron over the layers (don't rub). Flip the shirt rightside-out, adjust the weave with your fingers to close the hole a bit, and press again with the iron. This isn't the best for tissue-weight or sheer/slub-knit t-shirts, but works for most knits.
  • If you're comfortable with a needle and thread, visit YouTube where there's many video tutorials showing you how to darn a hole in your t-shirt. You'll want a thin needle and non-shiny thread the same color as your shirt. This is a great option for thin or dressy knits as it doesn't add any bulk.

And if you have any hacks that have proven successful (and haven't left gummy residue all over your favorite jeans) do share in the comments below!

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4 Comments

4 Comments

  • Chris Rose April 5, 2018

    “I got moths – big, junky, mutant moths.”

    ~Whoopi Goldberg as Terry Dolittle in Jumping Jack Flash (1986)

  • Jacquie April 5, 2018

    Great post! I thought I had moths in my closet! Ha ha ha! Thanks for the helpful tips!

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