Questions from the StatCounter

Another post answering some of the questions of women who Google…

What Necklace to Wear with a Wrap Dress?
Often with this style of dress, a necklace isn’t necessary because of the dress detail. The v-neck elongates the neck and gives a dramatic look on its own. I often pair a wrap dress with more dangly of earrings or hoops to continue that long look. However if you desire a necklace with a solid and simple wrap dress, a thin chain with simple pendant would be lovely, or switch it up with a long chain that goes past your rib cage or even navel. If you are an accessories maven, several strands of pearls in the neckline can be tres chic and sassy.

How to Hem Pants without Stitching?
I do NOT recommend this for long-term because it doesn’t look polished or chic, but I have been known to hold up a torn hem with Stitch Witchery. This and many similar products are a glue of sorts that will fuse two pieces of fabric together, often with heat from an iron. It doesn’t work on heavy fabrics like denim and wool, it ruins the line and gets too stiff with crepes and silks, and all in all looks messy but if you are in a pinch, it’s a great item to have on hand.

If you are not a seamstress, your local dry cleaners will usually hem pants for you for a very nominal price. This price will be less than buying new pants – a very real situation if you try to glue or staple your hems (yep, I have done that in a pinch too – try to get the staple right in the side seam so the staple isn’t showing and NEVER use this on fine fabrics!!).

What Heel Height for a Job Interview?
I think anything below 3” that is comfortable for you. I think a higher heel can be paired with pants for a very stylish yet professional look; with a skirt I recommend a more conservative yet flattering heel height like between 1 and 2.5 inches.

As a woman, we have the option to wear either a skirt or pants for an interview. I prefer pants because they make me feel confident and secure and strong. I pair pants with a feminine heel to show that I am tough, but have a personality. If I were to wear a skirt, I would pair it with very sensible simple leather pumps so I didn’t look to frivolous.

Can You Wear Teal Blue and Gold Shoes with a Black Dress?
Oooh, this is a toughie. No clear answer for this one. Now if your black dress is super simple like a sheath or a tube and the shoes are totally wild and funky and you maybe wear gold earrings and no other accessories then you could look very awesome. But if you pair it with a black dress with detail and some flounces and a gold bracelet and earrings and done hair… well then you will look confusing. Also are the shoes thin and delicate or chunky platforms? That can also make a difference. I am seeing teal and gold shoes with a navy dress… but it could be nice with a very simple simple black one.

Facial Bleach Turns My Hair Too Light
When I used to tan, I had that issue. And that’s when I stopped bleaching all together. Bleached hair does not disappear, it just becomes white or blonde. Do yourself a favor, invest in some Surgi-Cream or a different way to hide the hair – actually removing it. Modern-day depilatories for the face do not burn, smell awful or make the hair grow back stubbly. I use a cream by Sally Hansen bi-weekly on my face and have found it to be gentler, easier and less obvious than all my years with the pot of Jolene Cream Bleach.

Cashmere Sweater Ruined by Dry Cleaning?
Well first things first, cashmere doesn’t dry clean well. If you want your cashmere to last for years, you need to baby it. This is an item that really needs to be hand-washed. Invest in a quality wash for delicates and wash it in your (cleaned!) sink, not really twisting or rubbing too much. After washing, gently press out excess water, and lay on a towel to dry flat. This article explains the process in beautiful detail.

I have hidden lay-flat drying garments on the floor under my desk, on top of my refrigerator, and under my bed. You will be surprised where you will find space where it can dry in peace without being in the way.

I dry cleaned my cashmere pashmina, and now the coloring is uneven. There really isn’t a way to remedy the situation, you have to know that each time you go to the cleaners you have the chance of having your garment ruined. I had a gorgeous ivory suit bleached unevenly from the cleaners and items pressed in ways that have permanently ruined the drape.

Many items like wool and silk can actually be washed in the gentle cycle of your machine. Use a detergent made for delicates, do not over-stuff the washer, and let items hang or dry flat. The only items I send to the cleaners are suits, lined dresses and pants and anything with embellishment.

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3 Comments

  1. March 28, 2007 / 12:52 am

    hey girl, I want to know how to find out what google searches people are using to find me! how do you do that? maybe not a post for this blog, but email me, ‘K? thanks!

  2. March 23, 2007 / 12:36 pm

    Alexa, this is a great comment, thanks so much for the information. I too rarely dry clean and try spot cleaning and airing out prior to taking them in for service. As for the Miele process, I will have to look into that! Thanks so much!

    And I do take my coats in as well at the end of the season.

  3. Alexa
    March 23, 2007 / 12:18 am

    Hi Dilly, Would you also include coats amongst the only items you send for cleaning? As an aside, I have a wardrobe of women’s clothing, many from upscale consignment shops, and I switched from perc dry-cleaning to a Miele wet-wash process, that uses water and surfactants, in my home state of MA. This has been a wonderful change for most of my natural and man-made/synthetic fiber clothing, and saved my worsted, and other wool garments, in particular from that scratchiness, and eventual deterioration of fibers that plagues the petroleum-based cleaning processes. The only reason I don’t send wool sweaters is because a couple have come back snagged or with a hole, even though the wet-cleaning left the wool (or silk, or cotton) feeling super-soft. I even went as far as to insist the cleaning of the sweaters was done with them turned inside out (!), just the way all my home-laundred items are prepped. The shrinkage due to the water-based process has been negligible however, or resulted in a scant half-inch off the length of longer items like pants or coats. I also use a silicon-based “dry-cleaner” as a back up for fibers that cannot have any moisture near them, such as satin silk, and all my 40s and 50s vintage garments, and for the dressier and finer ones choose the “silver service” option wherein each garment is handled individually from start to finish, and not bundled in with other clothes. I had to “interview” several cleaners first to make sure their handling was more attentive, and the steaming/pressing done professionally, because of sloppiness I’ve experienced before, making sure I charmed them (touchy prima donnas these!). More than resorting to cleaning, I air my clothes at least overnight before they are put back in the closet, and use the airing process more than sending items to the cleaners. Since I’ve built up my wardrobe over the years, with attention to certain style characteristics I believe suit my body, keeping it well-cared for is as important as the time and effort in its selection. I invariably gain wonderful advice from your columns, and hope you are able to keep posting regularly.

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