Weekend Reads

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Photo by Colton Duke on Unsplash

Weekend Reads

Dieta culture & me. (Bustle)

As a bioengineer, Linda Griffith once grew a human ear on the back of a mouse. Now she is reframing endometriosis as a key to unlocking some of biology’s greatest secrets. (New York Times)

I don't want to stress you out but… Sleeping too little in middle age may increase dementia risk. (New York Times)

Can we dismantle fat phobia on the red carpet? (Vogue)

8 years after the Rana Plaza tragedy, what has changed for Bangladesh’s garment workers? (The Fashion Law)

The pregnant woman who led a legendary slave rebellion. (Narratively)

For the first time, two Black women have won an Oscar for Best Makeup and Hairstyling. Allure investigates why it took this long — and whether this marks a turning point. Will the beauty challenges of acting while Black finally be addressed by more than hashtags? (Allure)

The problem with “mom boss” culture. (Vox)

If you're familiar with Rachel Hollis… strap in for a bumpy ride of the past year. (New York Times)

This article is about female athletes being harassed on social media, focusing on Crossfit. But honestly, every woman I know gets harassed in her DMs with unwanted d*ck pics, aggressive and violent messages about what men want to do to us, and even more aggressive and violent when ignored and blocked. (Morning Chalk Up)

Pink houses, Black lives, And John Mellencamp’s misunderstood legacy. (Indianapolis Monthly)

More menopausal beauty and personal care brands are coming to market, but is the world ready? (Glossy)

LVMH is tackling the issue of waste with the launch of Nona Source, a deadstock fabric platform. (Vogue Business)

If you're like me and have wider feet and are looking for cycling shoes, I recommend these which I picked up last month. I got the pink trim ones and they're really comfy. I got them without cleats and added the ones I had on my old shoes. In fact, they were so roomy I was able to fit a pair of my favorite insoles in them for even more stability and support. I had no idea spinning shoes could be so comfortable!

I know I am not the only one updating their wardrobe for leaving the home; if you're in need of a new bag this leather crossbody is under $100, has only 5-star reviews, and comes in six great colors.

A Chinese ‘Auntie’ went on a solo road trip. Now, she’s a feminist icon. (New York Times)

Are thrift stores being gentrified by wealthy teens? (Vox)

A letter to anyone feeling pressure to lose the ‘Quarantine 15’. (Self)

GenX, AARP is coming for us! (New York Times)

And speaking of which… in random things you may want to know to feel hip when hanging with the youngins, there's a term for those of us who aren't hip or may be trying too hard. Welcome to Cheugy. Good to know so if we're called it! (New York Times) And a bit more on the topic of Cheugy. (In The Know)

Hear/See/Read

Aya and the Witch 3
This is Earwig. You will find out in the film why she has that name but you won't find out why she has that hairstyle.

We had not read nor heard a single thing about the animated film, Earwig and the Witch, but based on the graphic and synopsis on the screen, we decided to watch it for a family film.

This was SUCH a weird movie. It felt like it was going on for a really long time without coming to a point of solution/culmination/ending that we asked one another, “How long is this movie anyway?” and next thing, it was over.

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Baby Earwig with her mom, Kasey Musgraves

But the weird for us was a good weird. A child of unknown age (goo goo gaga yet has full pigtails and a head bigger than the mom) is dropped off at an orphanage; her mom (played by Kacey Musgraves) says she'll be back though it may take years. The child (named Earwig, but renamed Erica) is very happy at the orphanage but then is adopted by a witch and some sort of demon known as “The Mandrake.”

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A photo of my sister, me, and Karl at the beach

Stuff ensues, things get interesting, things get weird, things get happy, and then there's a knock on the door and the film ends.

Earwig and the Witch got terrible reviews from those that knew past work by the artist, writer, director, and studio. But if you come into the film without any history or knowledge… I found it entertaining. Weird, but enjoyable. My kid loved it, my husband enjoyed it too.

For Your Entertainment

If there is a new Billie Eilish, it's likely I will be sharing it here. And Billie dropped a video (that she directed) for her single, “Your Power” earlier this week. Billie Eilish's next album is dropping July 30th; get a taste of it here:

5 Comments

  1. Jeffiner
    May 3, 2021 / 12:21 pm

    Also, my 6 year old daughter’s hair sometimes resembles Earwig’s. Especially after swimming.

  2. Jeffiner
    May 3, 2021 / 12:19 pm

    I haven’t seen Earwig and the Witch yet, but it looks cute. As for how I suspect it ended…I read once that “endings” are a cultural thing, and Americans love to have everything tied up with a definite ending. The Japanese don’t, to them the stories are just a bit of time, and there was life before and after the story and there isn’t an “end.” Its a cultural difference that is subtle yet fascinating, and I would love to explore it more one day. The article that I first read about it was trying to explain why Americans love apocalypse movies – because it provides our imaginations with an “end” to everything.

  3. Bridget
    May 1, 2021 / 7:40 pm

    I was a summer research student in Linda’s lab! It’s so great to see her continuing to do amazing things and advocating for women.

  4. Ruth
    May 1, 2021 / 10:35 am

    I assume Earwig’s hair looks like that because they look like Earwig pincers?

    I needed the word “cheugy” in my life!

  5. Karen
    May 1, 2021 / 8:43 am

    The saddest part of the article about the CrossFit athletes being harassed, the comments. And thank you for the link to the the John Mellencamp, I’ve been a fan since the Jack and Diane days, and truly believe he has been unappreciated as a musician and social commentator

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